Posts Tagged ‘work instructions’

Document control – it can be easier than some may think!

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Recently, I was perusing through a quality discussion forum and the question was asked “Is it ever a good idea to organize and name your company’s files, documents, procedures, work instructions, and other items according to the numbering system of ISO/TS requirements?”

I am always horrified when a company starts constructing a quality system based on a standard rather than their own internal processes. Standards such as ISO 9001 or ISO/TS 16949 should be used as a guide for the construction of the quality system and not the reason for its existence. These types of “let’s satisfy ISO first” quality systems have a tendency to become thought of as documentation for “that annoying ISO stuff!”. This can eventually lead to documents being ignored, or worse, rewritten and uncontrolled in order to be thought of as more relevant to their use.

There is no prescriptive method for numbering or naming your quality system documentation. Usually, simple revision date codes or numbers can be used to provide a level of control needed to meet requirements.

Make your documentation easy to use by somehow identifying it with the process they are associated with to provide a more relevant and effective understanding of their use.

For more tips on document control, contact G3 Solutions today!

When conducting internal audits, planning is key

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

As consultants and trainers, we are often asked about the internal audit process and the amount of time that should be given to internal auditors to complete their audit. Obviously, there are many factors that go into the calculation of time that should be spent performing an audit. Complexity of process, number of employees, number of facilities and document review all have a big factor in audit time management.

One area that should always be given a significant amount of audit time is document review. Too often, we see companies that provide to their audit team members pre-packaged materials such as audit checklists or a few standard questions that become both predictable and repetitive, and end up providing no real value to the process.

Internal auditors should be given plenty of time to review the appropriate standard, process flow diagrams, procedures, work instructions, key metrics/measureables and previous audit data to ensure that they have a thorough understanding of what should be happening before they conduct the audit. The end result will be an effective audit that can provide real benefits and continual improvement opportunities.

Visit g3iso.com for more tips on internal audits.

ISO Implementation – Get People Involved!!

Friday, February 13th, 2009

The proper implementation of any quality management system should invole all employees in some manner, regardless of the standard. Many times it is common to see procedures and work instructions developed by personnel who do not (or have never) been part of that function or process. This can be one of the biggest mistakes a company can make in implementing a quality system.

One of the key principles that ISO 9001 and many other standards were based on is the involvement of people. People at all levels are the essence of an organization and their full involvement enables their abilities to be used for the organization’s improvement.

The resulting output of employee involvent can provide numerous benefits, such as:

  • Motivated, committed and involved people within the organization.
  • Innovation and creativity in furthering the organization’s objectives.
  • People being accountable for their own performance.
  • People eager to participate in and contribute to continual improvement.

    Applying the principle of involvement of people typically leads to employees:

  • understanding the importance of their contribution and role in the organization.
  • identifying constraints to their performance.
  • accepting ownership of problems and their responsibility for solving them.
  • evaluating their performance against their personal goals and objectives.
  • actively seeking opportunities to enhance their competence, knowledge and experience.
  • freely sharing knowledge and experience.
  • openly discussing problems and issues.

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  • Visit our wesite at www.g3iso.com today!