Posts Tagged ‘standard’

GM is putting quality to the test!

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

A recent Detroit News article describes the efforts of a General Motors facility to maintain a high standard of quality as plant production increases towards capacity. GM credits much of its progress in quality to the implementation of lean systems and other quality programs. Click for link to article.

For more information on these quality initiatives, contact G3 Solutions and ask how your organization can benefit from these tools.

Top ten reasons why some companies aren’t getting the most out of their ISO 9001 quality system

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

In the coming weeks, we are going to give you all of our top ten reasons why some ISO 9001 based quality management systems fail to provide some organizations with real process improvement. We may post another topic here and there, so you’ll just have to check back frequently to see our full list. Enough already!! Let’s begin-

#10 – Too many procedures – the company quality system is from a template!

When performing internal audits for companies, we sometimes see quality system documentation that is rather extensive, especially in older systems that were developed before the major ISO 9001 revision in 2000. Systems based on the old twenty element model contained a procedure for almost every requirement, not to mention a handful of work instructions for every procedure. When the revision came along, some companies interpreted it as a simple renumbering scheme and added a process map that looked like a wiring diagram for the Space Shuttle. Having a system today based on a standard from yesterday usually leads to a lot of frustration, minimal user friendliness, and can also become a “Rubik’s Cube” nightmare for document control.

Another reason for over documentation is that some companies have “borrowed” documentation from other organizations and tried to simply insert their name. This can be easy when the size and industry of the companies are identical, but when you try to implement a system from a 300-employee casting facility and your company is a 20 employee plating shop, you’re in for one big mess of a quality system. In a lot of cases, companies that were in a hurry to implement quality systems to please their customers would buy templates from consultants and were tempted to try the “insert name here” approach. Both approaches can diminish or even negate any value from implementing an ISO 9001 system.

The ISO 9001:2008 standard allows for an amazing amount of flexibility in documentation which provides a real opportunity to create a system that is simple, efficient and relative to the operations of an organization. If your system sounds like what has been described earlier in this posting, you may find it a worthwhile endeavor to overhaul your quality manual and procedures. If you’re starting out and are looking for an easy way to get something in place, contact the experts at G3 Solutions today!

Congratulations! You are now in charge of creating an ISO 9001 system – now what?

Monday, August 31st, 2009

Quite often, the G3 staff is asked to recommend a plan of action for people who find themselves in the position of “being volunteered” to put together an ISO 9001 (or any other ISO 9001-based standard) system for their company. Unfortunately, for employees that have little to no experience with quality standards, this can be an overwhelming task. We recommend the following steps:

Step 1 – Before you can plan what to do, you and the management team need to know what is required. Start with an overview training session on the standard for yourself followed by a session for top management. Strongly emphasize that the standard is process based and highlight the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) model. All parties involved in the implementation must realize that the standard has a couple of key principles that are referenced all throughout the standard – customer satisfaction and continual improvement. The ultimate goal is to make all customers happy, but the method of getting to that goal is by the continual improvement of your processes. This is where top management needs to make a little paradigm shift – customer satisfaction means more than a reduction in phone calls from the customer yelling about something that wasn’t just right. It certainly means more than assuming a customer is happy if they continue to give orders for more products and services. Remember, customers can multi-task by giving your organization a new purchase order while giving a new supplier the thumbs up for the next order. By the time some realize the customer isn’t happy, it can be too late.

This is where continual improvement comes into play. By knowing what your customers think of the level of service and value they receive from your organization, your company can initiate the proper continual improvement objectives that can reduce or eliminate the problems and issues that can make their way to the customer.

This is why you need to get all of top management involved. Everyone must get a clear view of the big picture. Having a quality management system (QMS) based on the appropriate ISO standard should become the implementation of a quality philosophy and roadmap for doing things right. Stress that it is a quality management system by which the company will operate and oh, by the way, it just happens to comply with the ISO standard. After that, don’t mention the letters “ISO” – just QMS. Companies that implement systems based on the need to meet ISO requirements often find that employees put an emphasis on doing things just to meet the standard as opposed to improving the process.

Additional steps will be discussed in future posts. Visit g3iso.com for more info.

Attention all automotive parts suppliers! Don’t miss the new revision to ISO/TS 16949

Friday, July 10th, 2009

ISO/TS 16949:2009, Quality management systems – Particular requirements for the application of ISO 9001:2008 for automotive production and relevant service part organizations, replaces the 2002 edition which has been used by the major automotive manufacturers to provide a baseline quality system for over 35,000 organizations worldwide that produce and supply parts for the automotive industry.

The 2009 edition was initiated to ensure its compatibility with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008, Quality management systems – Requirements. There are no essential changes to the technical requirements. The modifications are mainly clarifications of certain requirements and do not add any additional requirements.

According to the IOS, up to the end of December 2008, at least 39,300 ISO/TS 16949:2002 certificates had been issued in 81 countries and economies. This represents a 12 % increase over 2007.

The IATF has set a transition period of 120 days from date of publication of the new edition – 15 June – for organizations to comply with the standard’s requirements. The details of the plan are given in a communiqué by the IATF Oversight Certification Body.

ISO/TS 16949:2009 was prepared by the International Automotive Task Force (IATF), with the support of ISO technical committee ISO/TC 176, which is responsible for the ISO 9000 family of quality management standards. Copies of the standard can be ordered through iso.org or other groups such as aiag.org – be sure to upgrade your copy today!

For more information on ISO/TS 16949, contact G3 Solutions today!

When implementing an ISO 9001 system, be aware of the tools that are available!

Friday, June 5th, 2009

The ISO 9001 standard was developed by the IOS Technical Committee 176. The committee has also been part of the development of many other standards to aid in the implementation and continual improvement of a quality management system. Be sure to look at some of these quality tools. They can help your organization implement an effective quality system that will provide real value in a number of areas.

Current standards from ISO/TC 176 and its subcommittees:

• ISO 9000:2005 Quality management systems – Fundamentals and vocabulary

• ISO 9001:2008 Quality management systems – Requirements

• ISO 9004:2000 Quality management systems – Guidelines for performance improvements

• ISO 10001:2007 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for codes of conduct for organizations

• ISO 10002:2004 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for complaints handling in organizations

• ISO 10003:2007 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for dispute resolution external to the organization

• ISO 10005:2005 Quality management – Guidelines for quality plans

• ISO 10006:2003 Quality management – Guidelines for quality management in projects

• ISO 10007:2003 Quality management – Guidelines for configuration management

• ISO 10012:2003 Measurement management systems – Requirements for measurement processes and measuring equipment

• ISO/TR 10013:2001 Guidelines for quality management system documentation

• ISO 10014:2006 Quality management – Guidelines for realizing financial and economic benefits

• ISO 10015:1999 Quality management – Guidelines for training

• ISO/TR 10017:2003 Guidance on statistical techniques for ISO 9001:2000

• ISO 10019:2005 Guidelines for the selection of quality management system consultants and use of their services

• ISO/TS 16949:2002 Quality management systems – Particular requirements for the application of ISO 9001:2000 for automotive production and relevant service part organizations

• ISO 19011:2002 Guidelines for quality and/or environmental management systems auditing

ISO 9001 – It is time to put the “document nightmare” perception away! (Part 3 of 3)

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

In Part 2, the definition of objective evidence was clarified and examples were given. The ISO/TC 176 guidance document on ISO 9001:2008 continues to clarify and explain how conformity with the standard can be achieved. It goes on to state:

“Objective evidence does not necessarily depend on the existence of documented procedures, records or other documents, except where specifically mentioned in ISO 9001:2008. In some cases, (for example, in clause 7.1(d) Planning of product realization, and clause 8.2.4 Monitoring and measurement of product), it is up to the organization to determine what records are necessary in order to provide this objective evidence.

Where the organization has no specific internal procedure for a particular activity, and this is not required by the standard, (for example, clause 5.6 Management Review), it is acceptable for this activity to be conducted using as a basis the relevant clause of ISO 9001:2008. In these situations, both internal and external audits may use the text of ISO 9001:2008 for conformity assessment purposes.”

By examining the intent of the standard, it is clear to see that a good amount of flexibility was built in to allow a company to make the standard work for them. A big fear of ISO implementation is the phobia of having to change an organization from top to bottom to have it meet requirements. The guidance document put out by ISO/TC 176 does a great job of putting these fears to rest.

For more help with ISO standards, contact G3 Solutions today!

ISO 9001 – It is time to put the “document nightmare” perception away! (Part 2 of 3)

Thursday, April 23rd, 2009

As we stated in Part 1, documentation for ISO 9001 does not need to be complex. With that being said, the next question that we are usually asked is “How do I show conformance to the standard when I don’t have a document for everything?”

In the ISO 9001 guidance document “Introduction and support package: Guidance on the documentation requirements of ISO 9001:2008”, it states the following:

“To claim conformity with ISO 9001:2008, the organization has to be able to provide objective evidence of the effectiveness of its processes and its quality management system. Clause 3.8.1 of ISO 9000:2005 defines ‘objective evidence’ as ‘data supporting the existence or variety of something’ and notes that ‘objective evidence may be obtained through observation, measurement, test, or other means.”

This suggestion provides an amazing amount of flexibility in showing conformance to the standard. If you need assistance with your ISO 9001 system, contact the ISO 9001 experts at G3 Solutions today!

ISO 9001 – It is time to put the “document nightmare” perception away! (Part 1 of 3)

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Although it is true that ISO 9001 does require documented evidence for many requirements, this should not be interpreted as needing a new document for everything you do. Many times companies can modify existing documents to provide evidence of conformity to ISO 9001 requirements. Standards such as ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 13485, ISO 14001 and others have additional requirements for added documents, but the same strategy of modifying existing documents can be used for a majority of those additional demands.

In the ISO 9001 guidance document “Introduction and support package: Guidance on the documentation requirements of ISO 9001:2008 Document: ISO/TC 176/SC 2/N525R2, October 2008″, it states “For organizations wishing to demonstrate conformity with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008, for the purposes of certification/registration, contractual, or other reasons, it is important to remember the need to provide evidence of the effective implementation of the QMS. Organizations may be able to demonstrate conformity without the need for extensive documentation.

There are other recommendations for document control which we will list in future posts. Just remember that the standard gives you an incredible amount of flexibility in putting together your documentation. If you would like additional ideas on how you can control your ISO documentation, contact the experts at G3 Solutions today!

Is AS9100 the right standard for our organization? What about AS9110 and AS9120?

Friday, March 20th, 2009

In order to diversify product lines and reach out to new markets, many manufacturing companies are venturing into the aerospace and defense industries. To make this transition successful, an organization should consider revising their ISO 9001 quality management system to incorporate the requirements of AS9100, AS9110 or AS9120. Some companies have difficulty knowing exactly which standard is right for their product and/or service. There are key differences between the three, and each has a distinct application.

AS9100 – This is for organizations that design, develop, and/or produce aviation, space and defense products or organizations providing post-delivery support.

AS9110 – Any organization whose primary business is providing maintenance, repair and overhaul services for aviation commercial and military products is a candidate for this set of requirements.

AS9120 – Designed for organizations that procure parts, materials, and assemblies and resell products to a customer in the aviation, space and defense industries, including organizations that split these commodities into smaller quantities.

If this is still confusing or you find that your company is in a “grey” area between these choices, contact G3 Solutions today!

Visit www.g3iso.com for more info.

Need ISO help? Ask us here first!

Wednesday, January 21st, 2009

Stuck on some quality or environmental issue and don’t know what to do? Post it here and we’ll ask our team of experts what they think is the answer. Questions can be on anything related to a quality or environmental system, standard, concept, program, etc. – you get the idea. What the heck – its free! Go on and ask. Consultants love to hear themselves talk – or in this case, see themselves write. We’re even humble enough to admit you might have a better idea or solution than us! So go on and post it and let’s see what happens.

Visit www.g3iso.com