Posts Tagged ‘procedure’

Top ten reasons why some companies aren’t getting the most out of their ISO 9001 quality system

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

In the coming weeks, we are going to give you all of our top ten reasons why some ISO 9001 based quality management systems fail to provide some organizations with real process improvement. We may post another topic here and there, so you’ll just have to check back frequently to see our full list. Enough already!! Let’s begin-

#10 – Too many procedures – the company quality system is from a template!

When performing internal audits for companies, we sometimes see quality system documentation that is rather extensive, especially in older systems that were developed before the major ISO 9001 revision in 2000. Systems based on the old twenty element model contained a procedure for almost every requirement, not to mention a handful of work instructions for every procedure. When the revision came along, some companies interpreted it as a simple renumbering scheme and added a process map that looked like a wiring diagram for the Space Shuttle. Having a system today based on a standard from yesterday usually leads to a lot of frustration, minimal user friendliness, and can also become a “Rubik’s Cube” nightmare for document control.

Another reason for over documentation is that some companies have “borrowed” documentation from other organizations and tried to simply insert their name. This can be easy when the size and industry of the companies are identical, but when you try to implement a system from a 300-employee casting facility and your company is a 20 employee plating shop, you’re in for one big mess of a quality system. In a lot of cases, companies that were in a hurry to implement quality systems to please their customers would buy templates from consultants and were tempted to try the “insert name here” approach. Both approaches can diminish or even negate any value from implementing an ISO 9001 system.

The ISO 9001:2008 standard allows for an amazing amount of flexibility in documentation which provides a real opportunity to create a system that is simple, efficient and relative to the operations of an organization. If your system sounds like what has been described earlier in this posting, you may find it a worthwhile endeavor to overhaul your quality manual and procedures. If you’re starting out and are looking for an easy way to get something in place, contact the experts at G3 Solutions today!

When it comes to training, don’t forget the follow up!

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Most companies do a good job of providing proper employee training to ensure a qualified and competent workforce. Clause 6.2.2c in ISO 9001 clearly states that any training or other actions taken by top management to achieve competence must be evaluated for effectiveness. This also holds true for many standards such as ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 14001, ISO 13485 and others.

A common issue found during internal and external audits is the lack of evidence to demonstrate that effectiveness is evaluated. Keep in mind the standard does not prescribe how this is to be done, so there is tremendous flexibility in how this task can be completed.

Always consider that every ISO requirement does not need a new procedure, work instruction or form! Simple changes to existing process documents can, in most cases, do the job just fine. Make sure the method chosen provides a gage that is useful to the company in evaluating resource needs. Remember, the goal for any quality system is to provide value to an organization – not just fulfill standard requirements.

For more information, visit g3iso.com today!