Posts Tagged ‘output’

Are company objectives for quality really working as a tool for improvement?

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Part of our top ten series of reasons some companies are not getting the most from their quality system -

Reason #7 – Quality objectives are never changed

One of the key requirements in quality standards such as ISO 9001, ISO/TS 16949, AS9100 and others is that an organization must establish and measure objectives for quality. Even though this is just one of numerous requirements found in various ISO standards, this one key mandate may provide the most overall benefit to an organization.

Setting objectives for quality throughout the company and monitoring those objectives should provide a useful overview of how well processes are performing. At times, we see companies that establish simple goals and objectives that are too easily met and remain virtually unchanged, sometimes over a period of years. When this pattern of perceived “success” in meeting objectives is investigated, it is often exposed that there is a company culture that assumes it is better to portray a positive than display any type of negative trend to either customers or third party auditors.

This can be a major roadblock in making the quality system a true tool for continual improvement. It often fosters a feeling of apathy in many employees who view the quality system as simple window dressing for keeping the current customer base happy and impressing potential customers. Once this attitude becomes part of the overall organizational culture, it is tough to reverse – but not impossible.

A primary function of top management should be to examine if current objectives and goals are providing a true evaluation of overall performance. The key output of this review should be to establish new goals that may be more realistic in terms of driving process improvement. Just because an organization may not be meeting goals and objectives and an analysis of data may show a negative trend, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the company is a quality freight train wreck.

By linking continual improvement initiatives and programs to numbers that aren’t traveling in the desired direction shows that the organization is truly dedicated to continual improvement. Once the top management of an organization like that described above makes a strategic paradigm shift in reviewing and understanding quality objectives, good things will happen. It will not only make the company look stronger to customers and auditors, but to those employees who are hoping for real process improvement.

Environmental reporting not keeping you busy enough? Get ready for Greenhouse Gas reporting!

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

It was only a matter of time – and the time has arrived.

The Environmental Protection Agency plans to establish a nationwide system for reporting GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions. It is a program that could serve as the basis for a federal cap on the buildup of carbon dioxide and other gases linked to global warming.

The registry plan would cover about 13,000 facilities that account for 85 to 90 percent of the nation’s greenhouse gas output.

The plan will be adopted by the end of the year and greenhouse gas statistics will be available by the end of 2010. The EPA requirements would apply to large industrial sources that emit 25,000 metric tons or more a year, including oil and chemical refineries; cement, glass, pulp and paper plants; manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines; and confined animal-feeding operations. In addition to carbon dioxide, emissions of methane and other greenhouse gases would have to be reported.

The good news is that most small businesses would fall well below the threshold and would not be required to report, EPA officials said.

For more info on GHG reporting, contact the experts at G3 Solutions.

ISO Implementation – Get People Involved!!

Friday, February 13th, 2009

The proper implementation of any quality management system should invole all employees in some manner, regardless of the standard. Many times it is common to see procedures and work instructions developed by personnel who do not (or have never) been part of that function or process. This can be one of the biggest mistakes a company can make in implementing a quality system.

One of the key principles that ISO 9001 and many other standards were based on is the involvement of people. People at all levels are the essence of an organization and their full involvement enables their abilities to be used for the organization’s improvement.

The resulting output of employee involvent can provide numerous benefits, such as:

  • Motivated, committed and involved people within the organization.
  • Innovation and creativity in furthering the organization’s objectives.
  • People being accountable for their own performance.
  • People eager to participate in and contribute to continual improvement.

    Applying the principle of involvement of people typically leads to employees:

  • understanding the importance of their contribution and role in the organization.
  • identifying constraints to their performance.
  • accepting ownership of problems and their responsibility for solving them.
  • evaluating their performance against their personal goals and objectives.
  • actively seeking opportunities to enhance their competence, knowledge and experience.
  • freely sharing knowledge and experience.
  • openly discussing problems and issues.

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  • Visit our wesite at www.g3iso.com today!