Posts Tagged ‘ISO/TS 16949’

Is your company registered to ISO/TS 16949? If so, be aware that the new Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA) 4th edition is available!

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

According to the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG), The new Measurement Systems Analysis Reference Manual (MSA), Fourth Edition is now available!

Developed jointly by Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors Company, the MSA reference manual provides guidance to automotive suppliers. The manual does not define requirements; it is a recommended guidance document and provides reference for selecting procedures to assess the quality of a measurement system.

The AIAG says that companies can begin using the MSA 4th Edition immediately. Due to the release of the MSA 4th Edition, the MSA 3rd Edition is now obsolete and no longer available through AIAG. However, it is recommended that you keep a copy of the MSA 3rd Edition for reference purposes.

The manual can be purchased through the AIAG. For additional help with MSA, contact G3 Solutions today!

CQI-15 and CQI-17 – new assessments join the family of CQI documents

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

A recent update from AIAG has announced that the new (CQI-15) Special Process: Welding System Assessment and (CQI-17) Special Process: Soldering System Assessment are now available in both hard copy and electronically as e-documents.

According to the AIAG update, “CQI-15 and CQI-17 focus on continual improvement, emphasizing defect prevention and the reduction of variation and waste in the supply chain. The Soldering System Assessment helps frame a common approach to a soldering management system for automotive production and service part organizations, while the Welding System Assessment does the same for welding management systems. In addition, both assessments support the automotive process approach in ISO/TS 16949.”

These documents join the family of other CQI assessment documents that include automotive supplier self-assessments CQI-9, CQI-11 & CQI-12 for heat treating, plating, and coatings. The assessments are part of the customer specific requirements for ISO/TS 16949. Chrysler will require CQI-14 self-certification from suppliers in 2011.

For more info on these assessments, contact G3 Solutions today!

Are company objectives for quality really working as a tool for improvement?

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Part of our top ten series of reasons some companies are not getting the most from their quality system -

Reason #7 – Quality objectives are never changed

One of the key requirements in quality standards such as ISO 9001, ISO/TS 16949, AS9100 and others is that an organization must establish and measure objectives for quality. Even though this is just one of numerous requirements found in various ISO standards, this one key mandate may provide the most overall benefit to an organization.

Setting objectives for quality throughout the company and monitoring those objectives should provide a useful overview of how well processes are performing. At times, we see companies that establish simple goals and objectives that are too easily met and remain virtually unchanged, sometimes over a period of years. When this pattern of perceived “success” in meeting objectives is investigated, it is often exposed that there is a company culture that assumes it is better to portray a positive than display any type of negative trend to either customers or third party auditors.

This can be a major roadblock in making the quality system a true tool for continual improvement. It often fosters a feeling of apathy in many employees who view the quality system as simple window dressing for keeping the current customer base happy and impressing potential customers. Once this attitude becomes part of the overall organizational culture, it is tough to reverse – but not impossible.

A primary function of top management should be to examine if current objectives and goals are providing a true evaluation of overall performance. The key output of this review should be to establish new goals that may be more realistic in terms of driving process improvement. Just because an organization may not be meeting goals and objectives and an analysis of data may show a negative trend, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the company is a quality freight train wreck.

By linking continual improvement initiatives and programs to numbers that aren’t traveling in the desired direction shows that the organization is truly dedicated to continual improvement. Once the top management of an organization like that described above makes a strategic paradigm shift in reviewing and understanding quality objectives, good things will happen. It will not only make the company look stronger to customers and auditors, but to those employees who are hoping for real process improvement.

Document control – it can be easier than some may think!

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Recently, I was perusing through a quality discussion forum and the question was asked “Is it ever a good idea to organize and name your company’s files, documents, procedures, work instructions, and other items according to the numbering system of ISO/TS requirements?”

I am always horrified when a company starts constructing a quality system based on a standard rather than their own internal processes. Standards such as ISO 9001 or ISO/TS 16949 should be used as a guide for the construction of the quality system and not the reason for its existence. These types of “let’s satisfy ISO first” quality systems have a tendency to become thought of as documentation for “that annoying ISO stuff!”. This can eventually lead to documents being ignored, or worse, rewritten and uncontrolled in order to be thought of as more relevant to their use.

There is no prescriptive method for numbering or naming your quality system documentation. Usually, simple revision date codes or numbers can be used to provide a level of control needed to meet requirements.

Make your documentation easy to use by somehow identifying it with the process they are associated with to provide a more relevant and effective understanding of their use.

For more tips on document control, contact G3 Solutions today!

When implementing an ISO 9001 system, be aware of the tools that are available!

Friday, June 5th, 2009

The ISO 9001 standard was developed by the IOS Technical Committee 176. The committee has also been part of the development of many other standards to aid in the implementation and continual improvement of a quality management system. Be sure to look at some of these quality tools. They can help your organization implement an effective quality system that will provide real value in a number of areas.

Current standards from ISO/TC 176 and its subcommittees:

• ISO 9000:2005 Quality management systems – Fundamentals and vocabulary

• ISO 9001:2008 Quality management systems – Requirements

• ISO 9004:2000 Quality management systems – Guidelines for performance improvements

• ISO 10001:2007 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for codes of conduct for organizations

• ISO 10002:2004 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for complaints handling in organizations

• ISO 10003:2007 Quality management – Customer satisfaction – Guidelines for dispute resolution external to the organization

• ISO 10005:2005 Quality management – Guidelines for quality plans

• ISO 10006:2003 Quality management – Guidelines for quality management in projects

• ISO 10007:2003 Quality management – Guidelines for configuration management

• ISO 10012:2003 Measurement management systems – Requirements for measurement processes and measuring equipment

• ISO/TR 10013:2001 Guidelines for quality management system documentation

• ISO 10014:2006 Quality management – Guidelines for realizing financial and economic benefits

• ISO 10015:1999 Quality management – Guidelines for training

• ISO/TR 10017:2003 Guidance on statistical techniques for ISO 9001:2000

• ISO 10019:2005 Guidelines for the selection of quality management system consultants and use of their services

• ISO/TS 16949:2002 Quality management systems – Particular requirements for the application of ISO 9001:2000 for automotive production and relevant service part organizations

• ISO 19011:2002 Guidelines for quality and/or environmental management systems auditing

New (or maybe rumored) Corrective and Preventive Action requirements! Make sure your system is up to speed!

Friday, May 8th, 2009

In order to accommodate the rumored additional changes to ISO 9001:2008, you will need to incorporate the following form into your organizations Corrective and Preventive Action system. It is also rumored that these requirements will affect additional standards such as ISO/TS 16949, ISO 14001, AS9100, ISO 13485, ISO 22000 and various other standards.

Free download: iso-mil-hf-car-par

The downloadable form was developed by members of the military to facilitate the documentation of key personal issues into a corrective and preventive action format. If you have any questions or require any help in the application or requirements of this form, please contact G3 Solutions. We will do our best to aid in the development of your quality management system and sense of humor.

ISO 9001 – It is time to put the “document nightmare” perception away! (Part 1 of 3)

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Although it is true that ISO 9001 does require documented evidence for many requirements, this should not be interpreted as needing a new document for everything you do. Many times companies can modify existing documents to provide evidence of conformity to ISO 9001 requirements. Standards such as ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 13485, ISO 14001 and others have additional requirements for added documents, but the same strategy of modifying existing documents can be used for a majority of those additional demands.

In the ISO 9001 guidance document “Introduction and support package: Guidance on the documentation requirements of ISO 9001:2008 Document: ISO/TC 176/SC 2/N525R2, October 2008″, it states “For organizations wishing to demonstrate conformity with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008, for the purposes of certification/registration, contractual, or other reasons, it is important to remember the need to provide evidence of the effective implementation of the QMS. Organizations may be able to demonstrate conformity without the need for extensive documentation.

There are other recommendations for document control which we will list in future posts. Just remember that the standard gives you an incredible amount of flexibility in putting together your documentation. If you would like additional ideas on how you can control your ISO documentation, contact the experts at G3 Solutions today!

Records – are you keeping all that you should?

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

Many companies registered to ISO 9001:2000 are now reviewing their quality management system (QMS) along with associated forms and documents to make sure that there is a smooth, trouble free certificate upgrade to ISO 9001:2008. This is a great opportunity to make sure that all records required to maintain the business are kept in such a way to satisfy the ISO 9001 clause 4.2.4, which states “Records shall remain legible, readily identifiable and retrievable.”

Companies should consider every record needed for the business, not just the ones listed for ISO 9001. Having all important records fall under the scope of the control of records procedure helps to provide real value in the QMS. If you have a system that is based on ISO 9001 but includes other requirements (e.g. – ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 13485, etc.), the list of records for 9001 is just the beginning of what needs to be maintained.

For a complete list of ISO 9001 required records, you can download the following document:
iso-9001-2008-records

If you need additional help with ISO requirements, visit g3iso.com today!

If only all business travel was this much fun!

Saturday, April 11th, 2009

Normally we use this blog for serious (or at least semi-serious) ISO info, but we just had to pass this along. The attached video has absolutely nothing to do with ISO 9001, ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 13485, ISO 14001 or any other ISO standard – we promise! If you travel a lot for business, you will definitely appreciate the clip.

Have some fun – click on the following link and watch: rapping_flight_attendant

When it comes to training, don’t forget the follow up!

Thursday, April 9th, 2009

Most companies do a good job of providing proper employee training to ensure a qualified and competent workforce. Clause 6.2.2c in ISO 9001 clearly states that any training or other actions taken by top management to achieve competence must be evaluated for effectiveness. This also holds true for many standards such as ISO/TS 16949, AS9100, ISO 14001, ISO 13485 and others.

A common issue found during internal and external audits is the lack of evidence to demonstrate that effectiveness is evaluated. Keep in mind the standard does not prescribe how this is to be done, so there is tremendous flexibility in how this task can be completed.

Always consider that every ISO requirement does not need a new procedure, work instruction or form! Simple changes to existing process documents can, in most cases, do the job just fine. Make sure the method chosen provides a gage that is useful to the company in evaluating resource needs. Remember, the goal for any quality system is to provide value to an organization – not just fulfill standard requirements.

For more information, visit g3iso.com today!