Posts Tagged ‘AIAG’

Is your company registered to ISO/TS 16949? If so, be aware that the new Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA) 4th edition is available!

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

According to the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG), The new Measurement Systems Analysis Reference Manual (MSA), Fourth Edition is now available!

Developed jointly by Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors Company, the MSA reference manual provides guidance to automotive suppliers. The manual does not define requirements; it is a recommended guidance document and provides reference for selecting procedures to assess the quality of a measurement system.

The AIAG says that companies can begin using the MSA 4th Edition immediately. Due to the release of the MSA 4th Edition, the MSA 3rd Edition is now obsolete and no longer available through AIAG. However, it is recommended that you keep a copy of the MSA 3rd Edition for reference purposes.

The manual can be purchased through the AIAG. For additional help with MSA, contact G3 Solutions today!

CQI-15 and CQI-17 – new assessments join the family of CQI documents

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

A recent update from AIAG has announced that the new (CQI-15) Special Process: Welding System Assessment and (CQI-17) Special Process: Soldering System Assessment are now available in both hard copy and electronically as e-documents.

According to the AIAG update, “CQI-15 and CQI-17 focus on continual improvement, emphasizing defect prevention and the reduction of variation and waste in the supply chain. The Soldering System Assessment helps frame a common approach to a soldering management system for automotive production and service part organizations, while the Welding System Assessment does the same for welding management systems. In addition, both assessments support the automotive process approach in ISO/TS 16949.”

These documents join the family of other CQI assessment documents that include automotive supplier self-assessments CQI-9, CQI-11 & CQI-12 for heat treating, plating, and coatings. The assessments are part of the customer specific requirements for ISO/TS 16949. Chrysler will require CQI-14 self-certification from suppliers in 2011.

For more info on these assessments, contact G3 Solutions today!

Chrysler to require CQI-14 self-certification from suppliers in 2011

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

A recent AIAG announcement states that James Bruin, manager, quality and warranty programs, Chrysler Group LLC, will formally announce on May 5, 2010, that Chrysler will require self-certification to the CQI-14 consumer centric warranty process in 2011. CQI-14 demonstrates how companies throughout the supply chain can embrace cultural change and reduce risk by striving to reduce warranty incident rate and feeding lessons learned back into the product development process.

According to the AIAG announcement, Mr. Bruin states that self-certification would be required of Chrysler suppliers. Over the last several months, Mr. Bruin has solicited input from members of the OESA Warranty Management Council and the AIAG Quality Steering Committee. On May 5, AIAG will also announce that CQI-14 warranty process training classes will be available in the latter part of 2010.

The announcement will take place during a larger session on consumer-centric warranty management that will be held at the MSU Management Education Center, Troy, Mich. During the session, AIAG and OESA will release the second edition of CQI-14, also known as “Consumer–Centric Warranty Management: A Guideline for Industry Best Practices.”

The position of AIAG on OHSAS 18001 – Is it politics once again?

Monday, March 23rd, 2009

In a recent official position statement from the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG), there appears to be a rather unenthusiastic regard for the implementation of OHSAS 18001 throughout the automotive supply chain. The statement, dated February 2009, presents the AIAG position quite clearly:

“The Automotive Industry Action Group Health, Safety, and Environmental Steering Committee believes firmly believes that the use of formal management systems are necessary for the effective management of health safety and environmental programs, and thus fully endorse ANSI Z10 and International Organization of Standardization (ISO) programs such as ISO’s 14001 environmental management standard.

We believe that management of safety and health as part of an existing management system is necessary to achieve overall HSE excellence. We believe that the management of health & safety under the BSI OHSAS 18001 program is good practice, but less efficient in terms of both cost and time, as compared to managing health & safety as part of an existing management system. This is fundamental to making safety and health integrated within existing management systems and part of the day-to-day business activities.

In conclusion, AIAG:
• believes that the International Labor Organization (ILO); OHSMS Guidelines of 2001 provide a sound basis for any nation or organization to develop an effective safety and health management system
• is concerned when entities such as BSI issue ’standards’ utilizing a numbering sequence that at the very least confuses many into believing the standard was issued by ISO, and
• will work to integrate health & safety programs within a comprehensive and effective management system, but will not specifically mandate OHSAS 18001 certification.”

Yet again, when it comes to having a so-called “standard”, politics has raised its ugly head one more time. What do you think? Log in and let us know!

For more information on OHSAS 18001, visit our website at www.g3iso.com today!

Automotive supplier self-assessments CQI 9, CQI 11 & CQI 12 for heat treating, plating, and coating

Wednesday, March 11th, 2009

Many smaller plating, heat treating and special coating companies have asked us about the requests they get from their automotive customers regarding self assessments. These are the CQI publications that are published by the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG). These are part of GM, Ford, and Chrysler ISO/TS 16949 customer-specific requirements and they apply to heat treating, plating, and coating suppliers. These are process self-assessments and the documents can be purchased through the AIAG.org website.

The CQIs for these processes are:
CQI-9 – AIAG Assessment Manual for Heating Treating
CQI-11 – AIAG Assessment Manual for Plating Processes
CQI-12 – AIAG Assessment manual for Coating Processes

If you need assistance with any of these assessments, contact the experts at G3 Solutions. Visit our full website at www.g3iso.com today!

The ISO/TS 16949 CORE TOOLS alphabet soup of APQP, PPAP, FMEA, MSA, SPC

Friday, February 20th, 2009

For those who are completely new to the automotive supply chain or automotive industry, the term “Core Tools” refers to a series of manuals published by the Automotive Industry Action Group (AIAG) that are supplements to the automotive quality standard ISO/TS 16949. The current version is ISO/TS 16949:2002 but will soon (within the first quarter 2009) become ISO/TS 16949:2009.

The following is a list of the core tools along with a brief explanation:

Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP) – A guide for the detailed planning of how a product will be designed and manufactured. One of the outputs of this process is something called a “Control Plan” which is a detailed step by step listing of how a part is manufactured.

Production Part Approval Process (PPAP) – This document provides a listing of the different document levels and requirements needed to have a customer approve a part to be placed into production that will eventually make its way onto a vehicle.

Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) – Aligned with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) specification SAE J1739, this process is a great way to document and prioritize potential failures of a part or system.

Measurement System Analysis (MSA) – If you have ever done a Gage R&R (Repeatability and Reproducibility) study, this booklet explains the method used in the ANOVA-based Gauge R&R process.

Statistical Process Control (SPC) – By collecting data from samples at various points within the process using control charts, variations in the process that may affect the quality of the end product or service can be detected and corrected, thus reducing waste as well as the likelihood that problems will be passed on to the customer.

This extremely abbreviated guide to core tools may provide more questions than answers – that is why you should contact the experts at G3 Solutions.

Visit our full website at www.g3iso.com today!